What is Radif?
What is Radif? - What is Radif? - Part 2 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Ostad Mohammad Reza Lotfi   
Thursday, 25 December 2008 06:28
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Contemporny Radif in Iran:

The eleven Radifs below form the basis of musical creativity and

improvisation in Iran today: 1- Radif of Mirza Abdullah as interpreted by Ismail Ghahramani.

2- Radif of Mirza Abdullah as interpreted by Noor Ali Boroomand.

3- Radif of Mirza Abdullah as interpreted by Musa Ma'roofi.

4- Radif of Mirza Hosseingholi as performed by his son, Ali Akbar Shahnazi.

5- Radif of Mirza Hosseingholi as interpreted by Habibollah Salehi, a renowned Radif expert and Student of Shahnazi.

6- Radif of Abdullah Davami (for voice) as sung by him.

7- Radif of Abdullah Davami as interpreted by Mahmoud Karimi.

8- Radif of Abdullah Davami as interpreted by Nasrollah NasehPour and sung by him.

9- Radif of Darvish Khan as interpreted by Morteza Nay Davood. 10- Radif of Darvish Khan as interpreted by Musa Ma'roofi.

11- Radif of Abolhassan Saba written by him for violin.


The suffix "Gah" which exists in most Asian countries' music including that of Iran is an adverb indicating time or place. It could therefore mean placement of hand" since Dast = hand. However, the definition of Dastgah in Amid's dictionary, i.e. it all the means and instruments gathered in one place to accomplish a certain task" is the more appropriate definition. In a Dastgah, all the related melodies and songs are present. For example, Dastgah-e-Shur consists of all the songs, moods and Gushehs (corners, about which more below) belonging to it. One can also say that Dastgah is a whole which contains all its parts such as its Gushehs and its moods. In common parlance, the reference to homes and cars is prefaced with th word dastgah which provides us with another hint to the meaning of the word in music. If we liken a Dastgah such as Shur to a house, then the entrance is the Daraumad (see below), the courtyard and rooms around it are the Gushehs (see below) and the room decorations constitute the mood (Haulat).

Daramad

In Iranian music, Daramad denotes beginning, appearing or coming out. The musician, by playing the Daramad is trying to orient the listener to the Dastgah that the musician is attempting to perform in. In colloquial usage, Daraumad also means appearing.

Daramad is used to introduce both Dastgahs as well as songs and Gushehs, such as Daraumads of Amiri, Shahnaz, Segah, Shur, etc.

Gusheh

just as the word Gusheh (comer) implies, it forms an integral part of the Dastgah and is in close relation to it. Gusheh is not able to stand on its own since it has neither Daramad nor Foroud (descent or return to the beginning of the melody).

The Gushehs of Basteh-Negar and Hazin are two examples.

Tekkeh

Tikkeh or piece is a piece of the Dastgah and is more complete than the Gusheh because it has both Daraumad and Foroud. Shahnaz is the name of a well known Tikkeh with its own Daramad and Foroud.

 



Last Updated on Saturday, 09 May 2009 14:52